Marie Joe Kfoury (ESR 15)


Abstract (pdf)



Poster (pdf)

ESR15_WS2_Poster


Click on the image to join the Live on December 13, from 12:30 to 14:30. You can also leave a comment at the bottom of the page or send an email to Marie Joe: Marie.Kfoury@ulb.be


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Julia Chiossi
5 months ago

Hello Marie-Joe, I was wondering why you include two discrimination tasks in ABX and AB models. Do you think they will be complementary somehow?

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Marie Joe Kfoury
5 months ago
Reply to  Julia Chiossi

 
Hello Julia, I have included a discrimination task and an identification task. They both assess speech perception but in different a way. In the discrimination task, participants should indicate whether two speech sounds are similar or different and for the identification task they should identify whether the third sound they hear correspond to the first speech sound that is associated with a bleu square or to the second speech sound that is associated with a red square. 

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Julia Chiossi
5 months ago

Hi Marie-Joe, I understand that you consider the ABX a identification task, but in this case I would include a nul option (none of the previous sounds) or have more items to identify. The problem with ABX is that it can be a purely discrimination task instead of identification… there is a bias towards interpreting it just as BX (the person can hear only the two last sounds (BX) and do a discrimination, if X = B than answer is B, if X != B, than answer is A). I am not sure if I made it clear… but probably it is just a detail for you to discuss in the group, if using both tasks would not simply give you the same answers just with the already expected statistical differences in the signal detection analysis.

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Marie Joe Kfoury
5 months ago
Reply to  Julia Chiossi

Yeah ! Great point. Actually its an ABX discrimanation task so yeah they are complementary in this case. Have you seen somoene using an ABX identification task? I would love to check that 🙂

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Aïda Regel Poulsen
5 months ago

Hi. Thank you for this presentation. Is it possible you enable the links on 1st slide for me?
It is not possible for me to copy from the YouTube channel and I am curious 🙂

I am wondering also about a transfer to children with hearing loss and their language development. As I expect the adults know meaning of body gestures, how would HoH children know of these? How can there be a transfer?

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Marie Joe Kfoury
5 months ago

Hello Aida,
 
this is the link for the congruent body movement:
 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/zycbi3vxuwt1rum/Cogruent%20Mouvement.mp4?dl=04
 
and this one is for the incongruent body movement:
 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/vz92omibayivzs8/Incongruent.mp4?dl=0
 
I’m working with body movements that aim at stimulating the articulatory qualities of speech sounds. In clinical practices and here in Belgium, we use these body movements to strengthen the phonological repertoires of children who have specific language and communication challenges. However, these kinds of movement are rarely discussed in the scientific literature.
Therefore, the aim of my study is to evaluate scientifically the impact of these body movements on speech perception and production. So, first I’m going to test that with French speaking adults with typical hearing who have difficulties to perceive and produce Arabic speech sounds and see if they could benefit from the congruent body movement condition. The next step would be eventually to test that with children with hearing loss. 

Let me know if you have any further questions.

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Aïda Regel Poulsen
5 months ago

thank you, Marie.
It looks all nice. maybe you can elaborate more on how the body movements underline intonation? or is it more to support speech perception and speech sounds in speech banana?
and what do you want to show with congruent >< incongruent movements?
Maybe I miss out on something.

And.. related Julia’s question about L2 learning.. would procedure of L2 learning be the same for all or is it likely the individual will do with L2 learning as he/she did with L1 learning? and might there be differences from one person to another on L1 learning?
I expect to visit your poster tomorrow.

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Julia Chiossi
5 months ago

As a follow up on Äida question. Do you expect that the speech perception development in second language learners (as you are testing) goes by the same mechanisms in children learning their first language? In other words, when it comes to phonetics/articulation, do we learn the second language the same way we learn the first? (I do not expect a clear answer, I’m just curious).

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Marie Joe Kfoury
5 months ago
Reply to  Julia Chiossi

Great question Julia! I am still learning about L2 learning mechanisms as my project ended up in this direction.
what I’m curious about is to examine the role of body movements in alleviating the difficulties to perceive and produce L2 speech sounds that do not exist in L1.
Then I will be testing the same thing with children with hearing loss as there are some distinct L1 speech sounds that are difficult for them to perceive even with hearing aids or a cochlear implant.
 
let’s talk more about that in the future and thank you for your interests and questions
Julia 🙂

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